The Mammut team recreates the Whymper ascent, on Shutlingsloe. Photo: Mick Ryan

The Mammut team recreates the Whymper ascent, on Shutlingsloe. Photo: Mick Ryan

A Swiss outdoor brand’s British staff have recreated the ascent of one of the world’s best known mountains to mark the 150th anniversary of its first being climbed.

A five-strong group from Mammut’s Macclesfield office scaled the slopes of Shutlingsloe inthe Peak District to commemorate the first ascent of its slightly more foreboding cousin the Matterhorn.

The Matterhorn was first climbed on 14 July 1865 by a team of seven, including British alpinist Edward Whymper.

A Mammut spokesperson said: “Given the strong links that exist between Great Britain and Switzerland surrounding the first ascent of this iconic mountain, the Mammut UK team decided to mark the occasion in this country.

“A five-strong party set out from the Mammut office in Macclesfield to ascend Shutlingsloe.

“At an ear-popping 506m, this peak is widely known as the Matterhorn of Cheshire. The group ascended via the North-West Face employing full Alpine techniques and had to endure temperatures as low as 30C.

The first ascent of the Matterhorn, by Gustave Doré. Image: Zermatt Tourismus

The first ascent of the Matterhorn, by Gustave Doré. Image: Zermatt Tourismus

“To mark the occasion, the team recreated the famous Gustav Dore illustration of Whymper and his team en-route to the summit.”

Having returned to basecamp and recovered from altitude sickness, Chris Roberts, expedition leader and managing director of Mammut UK, said: “It was a great honour to lead this anniversary expedition and mark Whymper’s achievement.”

Also to celebrate the anniversary, Mammut created the Matterhorn collection – a bespoke range of clothing, footwear and also created an advert featuring an illuminated Hörnli Ridge.

The Swiss-based company has partnered Zermatt Tourism in a series of events in and around the village of Zermatt which lies in the shadow of the famous 4,478m (14,692ft) peak.

The first ascent by Edward Whymper, Charles Hudson, Lord Francis Douglas, Douglas Robert Hadow, Michel Croz, Peter Taugwalder and his son of the same name ended in tragedy when Hadow, Croz, Hudson and Douglas fell to their deaths.

Whymper, who is buried in Chamonix, is perhaps best remembered for his quote: “Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime.

“Do nothing in haste; look well to each step; and from the beginning think what may be the end.”

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