Emma Atkinson from nearby Low Briery caravan park and dog Togo on the newly created Keswick to Threlkeld path's diversion

Emma Atkinson from nearby Low Briery caravan park and dog Togo on the newly created Keswick to Threlkeld path's diversion

A new diversion on a route in the Lake District that was hit by Storm Desmond has been opened to walkers.

The December 2015 floods washed away part of the former Keswick to Threlkeld railway, including two bridges.

More than 200m of the old track bed along the popular route were affected by the storm.

The Lake District National Park Authority said, although these sections are cordoned off, the newly completed deviation takes users off the old rail line via a ramp and on to a 45m causeway crossing an area of wet woodland.

Linking to an existing permitted footpath, the route leads to the Brundholme road and on to Threlkeld village.

Lake District national park’s projects ranger Scott Henderson said the diversion established an invaluable connection for locals and visitors alike.

He said: “Unfortunately, the terrain makes it unsuitable for cyclists and wheelchair users, but will be warmly welcomed by walkers.

“We all look forward to the entire pathway being fully reinstated and are working hard to achieve this.

“In the meantime, significant parts of one of our best used routes can be enjoyed, but we would ask that people stay away from the cordoned-off areas.”

Work was funded by the Lake District national park and carried out in partnership with Eden Rivers Trust apprentices.

Mr Henderson said thanks were due to the landowner and Cumbria County Council for their help with the project.

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