A wolf. Alladale Estate intends to apply for a zoo licence for three of the animals. Photo: Frank Wouters CC-BY-2.0

A wolf. Alladale Estate intends to apply for a zoo licence for three of the animals. Photo: Frank Wouters [CC-2.0]

The Mountaineering Council of Scotland says it will make a submission on the planned keeping of wild animals on a Scottish estate.

Paul Lister’s Alladale Estate has given notice that it intends to apply for a zoo licence to keep wolves, wild boar and European wildcats in addition to the two elk that are already on the site. The MCofS is urging other with an interest in the case to make representations.

A statement from the MCofS said the relevant law dictates two months’ notice must be given to local authorities of the intention to apply for a zoo licence. It continues: “The date on the council received this was 16 December 2009, so it can be assumed that an actual application will be lodged approximately mid-February.

“The relevant act specifies the consultees, including ‘any other person with proper objections’. The MCofS intends making a submission, but if you feel strongly about this, as with other developments, a force of numbers responding will make a huge difference.”

The creation of the proposed Alladale Wilderness Reserve would entail the closing off of a large swathe of land, which opponents say is against Scottish right-to-roam law.

Ramblers Scotland have already said they will object to the application. Director Dave Morris said: “We expect to oppose the issue of this zoo licence. Approving such a project would be contrary to the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 as it would prevent people exercising their statutory rights of access over a large area of land.
“There are already problems with his existing enclosure, with its high fence and electrified wires which make it near impossible to cross. The Alladale situation suggests that it is time for us to ask the Scottish Parliament to prohibit the use of electric fencing in Scotland in association with deer fencing or other forms of high fencing.”

Details of the zoo licence notification are on the licensing page of Highland Council’s environmental-health section of its website.

The Mountaineering Council of Scotland says it will make a submission on the planned keeping of wild animals on a Scottish estate.

Paul Lister’s Alladale Estate has given notice that it intends to apply for a zoo licence to keep wolves, wild boar and European wildcats in addition to the two elk that are already on the site. The MCofS is urging other with an interest in the case to make representations.

A statement from the MCofS said the relevant law dictates two months’ notice must be given to local authorities of the intention to apply for a zoo licence. It continues: “The date on the council received this was 16 December 2009, so it can be assumed that an actual application will be lodged approximately mid-February.

“The relevant act specifies the consultees, including ‘any other person with proper objections’. The MCofS intends making a submission, but if you feel strongly about this, as with other developments, a force of numbers responding will make a huge difference.”

The creation of the proposed Alladale Wilderness Reserve would entail the closing off of a large swathe of land, which opponents say is against Scottish right-to-roam law.

Ramblers Scotland have already said they will object to the application. Director Dave Morris said: “We expect to oppose the issue of this zoo licence. Approving such a project would be contrary to the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 as it would prevent people exercising their statutory rights of access over a large area of land.

“There are already problems with his existing enclosure, with its high fence and electrified wires which make it near impossible to cross. The Alladale situation suggests that it is time for us to ask the Scottish Parliament to prohibit the use of electric fencing in Scotland in association with deer fencing or other forms of high fencing.”

Details of the zoo licence notification are on the licensing page of Highland Council’s environmental-health section of its website.

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