Crampons are essential on Snowdon and the national park's other high peaks. Photo: Snowdonia NPA

Crampons are essential on Snowdon and the national park's other high peaks. Photo: Snowdonia NPA

Parts of Snowdonia’s high mountains are dangerous, a warden warned.

National park staff pleaded with walkers not to head for the high peaks if they are not properly equipped and experienced.

The warning came as park staff prepared for an influx during school holidays this week.

Wardens said there are plenty of lower-level walks where crampons and ice-axe are not needed, and urged families to use these routes rather than the mountain tops.

Mair Huws, head of the national park’s warden service said: “Although it’s spring, there continues to be snow on the summits and in some places, it’s unstable and very dangerous.

“That’s why we are asking everyone who ventures out to the mountain peaks to ensure that they come prepared with the correct skills and tools.

“As well as the usual equipment required for mountain walking, ice axe and crampons are an additional necessity under present conditions.

“If people want walks that are more challenging during the next few weeks, remember that you do not have to go to the peaks of the Snowdonia mountains to experience adventure.

Snowdon has areas where snow is unstable and dangerous, wardens said. Photo: Snowdonia NPA

Snowdon has areas where snow is unstable and dangerous, wardens said. Photo: Snowdonia NPA

“Snowdonia has a number of suitable walks which do not require special equipment. For example, between Beddgelert and Rhyd Ddu is the new Lôn Gwyrfai route, a lovely walk which offers magnificent views of the mountains.

“Or, in the South, there is a series of various circular walks such as Precipice Walk above Dolgellau, Foel Caerynwch Walk or the Torrent Walk near Brithdir gives you fantastic views of the Meirionydd hills.”

Just over a week ago, eight people were avalanched on one of the most popular walking routes up Snowdon, the Pyg Track. The same day, a man fell 150ft after falling through a snow cornice on another part of the 1,085m (3,560ft) mountain.

Ms Huws said: “Remember that the peaks of Snowdonia have been here for thousands of years, and they’ll continue to be here in the summer. So why not embark on one of the other walks this half-term and come back later in the year to venture higher, when the weather is kinder and daylight is longer?”

The Snowdonia National Park Authority has an online guide to walking routes on its website.

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