Members of 59 Commando Squadron Royal Engineers at work on the new bothy at Camasunary. Photo: Major Iain Lamont

Members of 59 Commando Squadron Royal Engineers at work on the new bothy at Camasunary. Photo: Major Iain Lamont

Outdoor enthusiasts are being warned to pack their tents after a storm put a bothy out of use.

The Camasunary Bothy on the Isle of Skye has been closed following major damage by high winds.

The Mountain Bothies Association, which cares for the building, said: “Many of the tin roof sheets have been blown off along with some timber work.

“Due to the possibility of further sheets becoming detached, the bothy should not be used until emergency repairs have been effected. A full assessment of the damage will be carried out as soon as possible.

“The new bothy at Camasunary is not yet ready for use, although it is hoped that it will be available shortly. In the meantime therefore, there is no bothy accommodation at Camasunary and intending visitors should be prepared to camp.”

The replacement bothy is being built because the present shelter’s owner decided he needed to take the existing shelter back for his own use.

Members of the Royal Engineers have constructed the building at Camasunary, and volunteers from the Mountain Bothies Association are fitting out the bothy internally.

The MBA said Alan Johnson was concerned that when he resumed his own use of the building there would be no basic accommodation available in the area for those who had enjoyed the bothy in the past and those who would visit the area in the future.

The new bothy is on the east side of the bay at Camasunary in the shadow of the munro Blàbheinn.

Bothies are available to walkers, climbers, mountain bikers and other outdoor fans free of charge overnight, subject to the Bothies Code.

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