Honister Crag, site of the proposed zipwire. Photo: Bob Smith/grough

Honister Crag, site of the proposed zipwire. Photo: Bob Smith/grough

The operators of Honister Slate Mine in the Lake District have applied for planning permission to install a zipwire.

Last week an unrelated application for controversial zipwires across Thirlmere was withdrawn.

The Lake District National Park Authority says representations from the public on the Honister proposals should be submitted by 12 March.

The slate mine, at Honister Pass between Borrowdale and Buttermere, says the ‘aerial wire’ would be dual purpose, used both for transporting extracted stone and conveying tourists.

Two previous attempts by Honister Slate Mine to gain approval for zipwires, in 2011 and 2013, were turned down by Lake District planners.

At the time, the Friends of the Lake District was one of the leading opponents of the Honister plans. The charity was also among many groups that expressed their opposition to Treetop Trek’s proposals for twin four-line wires across the valley over the Thirlmere reservoir.

The company withdrew its application in the face of planning officials’ recommendation to reject the bid. Treetop Trek said one of its reasons for abandoning the plans was the Ministry of Defence’s objection to the scheme, which it said would pose a danger to pilots who use the area for low-flying exercises.

The MoD said it has no objections to the Honister plans, which have gained support from Borrowdale Parish Council.

The aerial runway would end at the main Honister Slate Mine buildings. Photo: Bob Smith/grough

The aerial runway would end at the main Honister Slate Mine buildings. Photo: Bob Smith/grough

Honister Slate Mine wants to build the zipwire from a site on Honister Crag on the north-eastern flanks of Fleetwith Pike to its base at Honister Hause. The company already runs tourist attractions such as a via ferrata and rope bridge at the site.

It said the proposed ‘aerial flight’ would enable slate to be mined at a location where it is currently not economically viable, and cites a historic precursor to the modern wire, which was used decades ago to transport stone.

It also says the installation would provide a ‘totally unique outdoor and environmentally sustainable visitor experience in the heart of the Lake District National Park for a wide range of demographics and social backgrounds.’

Honister Slate Mine said it anticipates a maximum of 57 descents on the wire daily by visitors.

Details of the application are on the Lake District National Park Authority website.

Some articles the site thinks might be related:

  1. Friends of Lake District: Thirlmere zipwire plans are ‘litmus test for national parks’
  2. Lake District zip wire plans withdrawn
  3. Friends of Lake District issue statement after ‘innacurate’ Thirlmere zipwire post
  4. United Utilities rules out any further Thirlmere zipwire application
  5. Controversial Thirlmere zipwire plans withdrawn over MoD low-flying concerns