The zip-wire would run from the crags on the left of the picture. Photo: Alan  Faulkner CC-BY-ND-2.0

The zip-wire would run from the crags on the left of the picture. Photo: Alan Faulkner CC-BY-ND-2.0

A conservation charity is urging walkers to back its objection to the proposed zip-wire in the Lake District.

Honister Slate Mine owner Mark Weir has submitted an application for a 1.2km wire ride, dubbed the Lancaster Aerial Flight, from Fleetwith Pike, at the head of the Buttermere valley, to the mines at Honister Hause.

But the Friends of the Lake District said the installation would be visually intrusive and cause extra traffic on narrow and remote roads.

Friends’ planning officer Richard Pearse said: “We have significant concerns over the impact of the wire, and the type and level of activity it would bring. This area of the national park is internationally recognised for its outstanding landscape and tranquillity.

“Even though many people already visit the Honister area the fells feel quite wild and remote. They are enjoyed by thousands of visitors who come to appreciate just this wildness and remoteness. The zip-wire would fundamentally change the area, passing very close to walkers using the popular Wainwright route to Haystacks.”

Honister Slate Mine’s statement says its groundbreaking plans to introduce a zip wire from near the top of the 648m (2,126ft) mountain would replicate a similar construction that existed at the remote quarry more than 80 years ago.

A composite panorama of the area produced by the Friends, with Fleetwith Pike, far right, where the proposed zip wire would start, running down into Honister Slate Mine, left

A composite panorama of the area produced by the Friends, with Fleetwith Pike, far right, where the proposed zip wire would start, running down into Honister Slate Mine, left

But Mr Pearse said: “This is just the wrong place for a new visitor attraction that would be aiming to attract large numbers of people.

“The national park exists to protect the fells from development so that people can enjoy their amazing landscapes. We are concerned not only about the impact of the development itself if it were approved, but also the precedent this would set for future development in the area.”

The zip wire would add to other attractions at the site, including Britain’s first via ferrata – a system of metal steps and wires that allow non-climbers to tackle technical rock routes – and the slate mine tours at the hause, between Borrowdale and Buttermere.

The application goes before the Lake District National Park Authority’s planning committee on 1 September, and the Friends are urging walkers to object.

Details of how to lodge an objection can be seen on the Friends of the Lake District website.

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  3. Lake District zip wire plans withdrawn
  4. Honister zip-wire hearing put back
  5. Mine owner will press ahead with plans for Lake District zip wire